Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and Democrat J.B. Pritzker spent a combined $105.2 million to win their respective party nominations — the equivalent of more than $100 per vote cast in last month's primaries, new campaign finance records show.

Pritzker, a billionaire Hyatt hotel heir and philanthropist, led the way by spending a record $68.3 million to win the crowded Democratic primary at a cost of $119.04 per vote. Pritzker collected more than 573,000 votes, or 45.2 percent of the ballots cast, and won by nearly 20 percentage points based on unofficial vote totals. Pritzker is self-financing his campaign.

Rauner, a wealthy private equity investor seeking a second term, spent nearly $37 million in eking out a narrow 2.8 percentage-point win over state Rep. Jeanne Ives of Wheaton. Rauner got around 361,300 votes — 51.4 percent — at a cost of $102.33 per vote. In contrast, Ives spent nearly $4.3 million in getting more than 341,000 votes at a cost of $12.55 per vote.

The unprecedented campaign spending foretells a state — if not national — record to be set for the fall general election between two wealthy politicians with a propensity to reach into their wallets to finance their campaigns.

Rauner put $50 million into his re-election campaign in December 2016 and received another $22.5 million from ally Ken Griffin, founder and CEO of the Citadel investment firm. Counting the money spent to win election in 2014, Rauner has put $95 million into his campaigns.

Pritzker poured a record $76.3 million into his campaign and has shown no inclination to seek outside donations. His decision to self-fund his bid helped him gain support from labor unions and other Democratic Party-allied groups that can now devote money to try to keep and expand Democratic majorities in the state House and Senate.

Campaign finance reports filed with the State Board of Elections show a combined $123.2 million spent by Rauner and Ives in the Republican governor primary and by Pritzker, state Sen. Daniel Biss of Evanston and businessman Chris Kennedy on the Democratic side.

The $68.3 million Pritzker has spent since announcing his candidacy last April already exceeds the $65.3 million Rauner spent on the 2014 race, when he won a crowded primary and went on to defeat Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn by 4 percentage points.

Pritzker spent $44.3 million on media, including TV ads, $8.4 million on consulting, $6.3 million on salaries, $3 million on direct mail and $1 million in contributions to local Democratic organizations, candidates and allies. In the campaign's final month, he spent $12.5 million, with $7.2 million devoted largely to TV ads and $1.3 million to direct mail.

In contrast, Biss, the Democratic runner-up with 26.6 percent of the vote, raised $5.5 million to go with $1.6 million he already had in his campaign fund. Biss spent $7.2 million, with $4.5 million used for TV ads and another $500,000 on digital advertising as he sought to appeal to younger voters. His spending, based on the more than 337,000 ballots he received, amounted to $21.56 per vote.

Kennedy, a wealthy heir to the iconic Massachusetts political family, raised $7.7 million, including $2.3 million out of his own pocket, since he announced his bid in February 2017. He spent $6.9 million, including $2.3 million in consulting fees, $1.9 million on media, $1.4 million on payroll and $300,000 on polling. Kennedy finished third with 24.3 percent and the more than 308,000 ballots he got amounted to $22.35 per vote.

Rauner spent more than $20 million on TV and radio ads, including $305,000 on behalf of the GOP nominee for attorney general, Erika Harold. Rauner also gave the state Republican Party, which he largely funds, $7 million.

Much of Rauner's campaign spending was focused on attacks on Pritzker. When Ives entered the race late last year, Rauner dismissed her as a "fringe" candidate. But Ives began gaining ground, an issue likely to have surfaced in the nearly $250,000 Rauner spent on polling. Rauner then went on to attack Ives and spent $5.3 million in March, more than half of it on attack ads.

Of the nearly $4.3 million Ives spent, almost $400,000 paid for the printing and mailing of a booklet critical of Rauner called "The Governor You Don't Know." She spent another $2.8 million on advertising, including a controversial TV ad that featured an actor portraying a transgender woman thanking Rauner for signing a law expanding trans rights.

In other statewide races:

— In the eight-way Democratic attorney general primary, victorious Kwame Raoul of Chicago raised nearly $2.7 million since Sept. 20 and spent nearly $2.9 million. The state senator already had some money in his account to start the contest.

Runner-up Quinn, the former governor, raised $1.8 million since last October, with about half of it in the form of loans from himself and allies. He spent $2 million.

Looking ahead to the fall, Raoul had $99,000 to start April and has since added another $40,000 in donations.

Republican opponent Harold raised nearly $730,000, with almost half coming from Rauner's donation of TV ads. She spent $322,482 in handily defeating DuPage County Board member Gary Grasso. Harold started the month with $91,557 and has since collected another $21,455 to take on Raoul.

— Democratic Secretary of State Jesse White listed $803,421 as he seeks a record seventh term against Grundy County State's Attorney Jason Helland, who reported $30,960 in his campaign fund at the end of March.

— Democratic Comptroller Susana Mendoza reported $1.1 million to start the month as she takes on former Republican state Rep. Darlene Senger of Naperville, who reported $22,561 available.

— Democratic Treasurer Michael Frerichs had $719,349 in his campaign fund while Republican challenger Jim Dodge, an Orland Park trustee, reported $15,353 available.