After prosecuting Wade Bonk over more than two decades, Tazewell County prosecutors aren’t about to give him a break.

Bonk, 39, of Pekin, was in court Wednesday for an appearance on his pending charge of possessing meth with intent to deliver. Last week, he was charged in federal court with conspiracy to distribute the drug in a similar but unrelated case.

State charges against defendants are at times dismissed when they subsequently face federal charges of the same nature, and which typically carry longer sentences with conviction.

Bonk would face a maximum seven-year prison term if he’s convicted of the state drug charge. His federal charge carries a range of 10 years to life.

That minimum term, however, would double if Bonk has a prior drug conviction. The Tazewell County State’s Attorney’s Office wants to give him one.

“We intend to go forward” with the state case, Assistant State’s Attorney Caelyn Deeb-Diver said after Bonk’s Wednesday appearance.

None of Bonk’s 40 prior convictions, including 13 felonies, are drug-related. Many of the latter, beginning with an aggravated battery in 1996, involved violent offenses. Bonk also was questioned but not charged in connection with two homicides.

He would be required to serve at least 85 percent of the sentence he’d receive on his federal charge. State prison terms typically are reduced by half with good behavior and parole.

Bonk is charged in his Tazewell drug case with possessing 18 small bags of methamphetamine when an officer stopped him for driving with a revoked license in December 2016. He told the officer he was on his way to deliver the bags, packaged for sale, to a person on Derby Street, according to a prosecutor’s court affidavit.

In Bonk’s federal case, he’s charged with conspiring to deliver at least 50 grams of meth between last May and September. Charged with him are fellow Pekin residents Darcy Kampas and Timothy Wood, both 40.

Bonk’s next scheduled court appearance on his Tazewell case was set for Jan. 5, allowing his attorney in that case to consult with his federal public defender. Bonk, Kampas and Wood are next due in Peoria’s U.S. District Court on Feb. 15.

Follow Michael Smothers at Twitter.com/msmotherspekin