Molly Brennan has put a portion of her soon-to-be college major to the test during her high school years, and her work has not gone unnoticed. 


The 18-year-old Washington Community High School senior — who has aspirations of someday becoming a high-school art teacher — won Best of Show for photography and received an Honorable Mention for a pen and ink drawing at the Mid-Illini Art Show March 16.


 

 

 

Molly Brennan has put a portion of her soon-to-be college major to the test during her high school years, and her work has not gone unnoticed. 

The 18-year-old Washington Community High School senior — who has aspirations of someday becoming a high-school art teacher — won Best of Show for photography and received an Honorable Mention for a pen and ink drawing at the Mid-Illini Art Show March 16.

“It was a nice surprise,” Brennan said, adding that she did not expect recognition for her work.

Although Brennan said she did not have much experience with photography before her freshman year in high school, one of her art teachers said she entered high school “as an artist.”

“I can still remember my first parent/teacher conference with her mom and telling her that Molly was a natural artist,” said WCHS art teacher Tiffany Wise-Fisher. “Molly sees and thinks in ways that others don’t. She just oozes creativity.”

Wyse-Fisher — who has taught Brennan for four years — said the recognition was much deserved.

“She is one of the most talented photo/
2-D students I have ever had,” Wyse-Fisher said. “She can’t just draw, she can formulate amazing ideas of what she wants to draw or photograph, and then execute it.”

Brennan works at Khouri’s Family Restaurant and participates in chamber choir and concert choir at WCHS.

When it comes to her artwork, she focuses on photography and drawing.

“I like setting up photos using crazy colors, like ‘Alice in Wonderland’ inspired things.”

With art, I can be as creative as I want,” she said. “I don’t really have to have any limits on it.”

However, she said that not all art forms come easily.

“I’m terrible at painting,” she said with a laugh.

Brennan plans to study art education at Webster University in St. Louis and follow in Wyse-Fisher’s and her other art teachers’ footsteps.

“Originally I don’t think I knew what I wanted to do,” she said. “But my art teachers are all kind of fantastic, so I just kind of wanted to do that because of them.”

Wyse-Fisher said the feeling of inspiration is mutual.

“Molly is one of those students who inspires her teachers and makes our job totally worth it,” Wyse-Fisher said. “She will someday make a profound difference.”