Katie Evans, a teacher at Washington Community High School, was among 50 educators from across the United States who recently participated in the Siemens STEM Institute.


 Katie Evans, a teacher at Washington Community High School, was among 50 educators from across the United States who recently participated in the Siemens STEM Institute.

This week-long professional development experience, presented by the Siemens Foundation and Discovery Education, is designed to foster student achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Selected through a competitive application process managed by the college board and hosted by Discovery Education in its Silver Spring, Md., global headquarters, Evans had the opportunity to hear from the nation’s leading education experts and collaborate with colleagues from across the country.

 Evans spent the week learning from and working with government officials, leading scientists, educational thought leaders and innovators including Dr. John Holdren, Chief Science Advisor to President Obama and Dr. Kristina M. Johnson, Under Secretary of Energy whose work across STEM disciplines shape and define today’s education landscape.  

At the institute, Evans was engaged in discussions and workshops around topics such as using technology and social media in the classroom to improve student achievement. She also visited the Department of Energy where she was able to observe real-world applications of STEM subject matter.

 “Meeting and working with fellow teachers and industry experts at the Siemens STEM Institute was a fantastic experience,” said Evans. “We may come from different backgrounds and teach in totally diverse environments, but attending the institute will help us meet our common goal of preparing and encouraging America’s students to lead the way in STEM industries in the future.”    

 To help continue each educator’s professional development once the institute concludes, participating teachers formed small groups that will continue researching STEM issues throughout the year. Evans’ project involves empowering students to take interest in STEM disciplines by connecting them with other classrooms across the U.S., and the results of the group’s research will be presented at the end of the 2010-2011 school year.

 “Teachers like Katie Evans should be recognized for their noble efforts in the classroom and we are honored to provide them with this opportunity to learn from industry leaders and their peers,” said Jeniffer Harper-Taylor, president of the Siemens Foundation. “I look forward to hearing back from Katie next year about her project and how her work here at the Institute has impacted her classroom in Washington.”

 For more information on the Siemens STEM Institute, visit http://www.siemensstemacademy.com/indexcfm?event=showContent&c=36.